Alexxsia Elizabeth, Fashion Design/ Styling

I started my collection from visiting the forest at night where I was charmed by the shadows, silhouettes and textures that appear out of the dark. I also looked at the eerie black and white photography of Wynn Bullock, his images referencing a lot of nature but with a sinister mood.

I was also inspired by the creatures of the forest such as fireflies and mythical beasts, centaurs, dryads, nymphs and more recent storybook characters such as Little Red Riding Hood.

 The garments are layers of naturally coloured, entangled fabric as well as sheer fabrics and wools, that have been developed to offer comfort alongside a high visual impact, fulfilling the desire for fantasy coupled with luxury, of looking well dressed and still making a statement that references the dark and twisted side of attire.

The woman who wears them is confident but still captivated and enchanted by her dreams and the things she sees out of the corner of her eye.

 As an aspiring stylist I wanted to experiment with my womenswear collection, so I did a menswear shoot using my garments, I felt this was successful showing the versatility of the clothes and pushing the dimensions of style.

            

Charlie May, Fashion Design

My inspiration initially derived from sparse decaying landscapes. I
liked how lonely and beautiful they looked and imagined that the whole
world was like this.
Taking further inspiration from the work of photographer Sebastião
Salgado. His imagery stark, and often in black and white portray a
sense of longing and loss, whilst being beautiful to look at. This
then developed into a post apocalyptic theme, focusing on survival.

My collection has been very hands on, I have rusted, dyed, bleached,
sand blasted, rasped my materials, to achieve that decayed look.
I also chose fabrics such as scarred leather, fine silks and wools to
complete the look.

I have always played with the nature of hard and soft fabrics. In this
collection I have combined the two, often in the same garment to give
great contrast. For example, silk and plastic tubing. I have also been
using the parts of the hide that other designers would discard, in
keeping with the aesthetic, I find the scarred, raw outer parts of the
leather as beautiful as the inner.

Buckles and ties feature heavily throughout as I wanted to get a real
feel that you were having to construct your own garments

Charlotte Lee, Textiles Design

My overall theme is very nature based; I had four main stories which include Coral, Flowers, Fish and Insects. I wanted to have variation within my stories which I incorporated through the use of colours ranging from the bold to the subtle and neutral. Using wood in my work was considered by me as something unusual and not already available on the market, I wanted to express how delicate coral was but also how structurally sound it is. As a Print and Textile designer I believe that we should encourage people to develop their senses and consequently I strive to put texture onto fabric that was once flat, generating new and unique fabric designs that reflected each story.

Vanessa Brownlie, Fashion Design
 Inspiration for this collection was taken from the undulating landscapes of Scotland and their representation in two dimensional map form. The bold silhouettes and intricate seam lines interplay with the body and the ebb and flow of motion extending as though they are a memory of movement and creating areas of unexpected volume.
 The unconventional choice of natural fabrics such as silk and leather combined with structured fabrics and boned underskirts, highlights the dynamics of the garments and the body, separately and as one. The colour palette is taken from the deep blues of freezing northern lochs with contrasting flashes of the golden yellows in the autumn brush and the soft greys of the slate paths that weave across the hills.
 The luxurious lightness in the fabric in contrast to the underlying structure and the way it moves on the body are fundamental to the concept of the collection. The asymmetry of the designs creates areas of intricate detail and elements of the unexpected, reaffirming the feminine and organic nature of women and providing an elegant and positive view of the female dresser.

Vanessa Brownlie, Fashion Design

 Inspiration for this collection was taken from the undulating landscapes of Scotland and their representation in two dimensional map form. The bold silhouettes and intricate seam lines interplay with the body and the ebb and flow of motion extending as though they are a memory of movement and creating areas of unexpected volume.

 The unconventional choice of natural fabrics such as silk and leather combined with structured fabrics and boned underskirts, highlights the dynamics of the garments and the body, separately and as one. The colour palette is taken from the deep blues of freezing northern lochs with contrasting flashes of the golden yellows in the autumn brush and the soft greys of the slate paths that weave across the hills.

 The luxurious lightness in the fabric in contrast to the underlying structure and the way it moves on the body are fundamental to the concept of the collection. The asymmetry of the designs creates areas of intricate detail and elements of the unexpected, reaffirming the feminine and organic nature of women and providing an elegant and positive view of the female dresser.

Rosanna Pinney, Print/Textile Design


My swatch collection ‘Tribal Exotica-Tribal Revival’ is based on a contemporary approach to and re-birth of tribal themes surrounding Amazonian tribal dress and African tribal body art. Print was largely informed by tribal markings and paint used to decorate the skin. Exotic wildlife and plant life of the Amazon inspired half of the print collection giving it a real zesty tropical feel. A mixture of mark making techniques, acid dyeing, discharge illumination and digital printing were utilised in the printing process. Laser cutting too formed an integral part of the collection cementing the ideas I had taken from Brazilian artist Cildo Meireles, of layering and repeating multiples of shapes cut out of my prints and stitched or manipulated to form new designs. The laser cut-outs and negatives had equal value and were taken forward to form swatches in their own right.

My vision for the collection as a complete entity was a body of swatches that echoed ancient tribal civilisations with a real ethnic feel, apparent in the heavy earthy and neutral wools, rustic crisp paper silks used and the hand-rendered body art prints. In contrast the collection has elements that fight each other subtly;-ethnic versus sporty tribal, with the juxtaposition of African-inspired prints with the vibrant Amazonian almost sporty-feel prints, still hand-drawn and brush-stroked but set down onto fabrics such as power net and neoprene to give it a more refined edge.

The print collection is realised as a whole by translation into accessory pieces, which act as a platform to voice an eclectic print style. The prints flaunt a tribal edge but also display an exotic feel with corals and acid lime against neutrals and deep navy.  

Kate Dunkling, Fashion Design

This colour-block collection has a hint of vintage, but puts a contemporary twist on sixties fashion. Colour is key, using quality fabrics such as silk and wool crepe, combined with cut and shape that create a feel of simplicity and wear ability.

 Inspired by the work of Pierre Cardin, attention to detail has been a focus point throughout. From circular pockets to buttonholes placed within seams, every detail of each garment has been painstakingly considered.

 Eclectic, fresh and clean-cut, this collection persuasively demonstrates the strength of colour in fashion.

Aimi  Gibbons, Fashion Stylist
I  started this project by taking over indulgent, excess qualities leading to a sense of entrapment within the obsession. As I got further  into the project this changed, I began stripping things down looking at  trends on the catwalk such as Vandevorst, Margiela, Celine and studying the  simplicity in fabrics and textures appear to be moving forward into s/s 10 and a/w 10.  This sense of honesty that these collections show I wanted to bring into my  own work and started to reference the clinical side of surgery, the medical  aspect, hospital gowns, these unflattering shapes, the unsexyness of it all.  After developing this further through various shoots and research I began to  think about my market and being Margiela, I applied his “white” aesthetic,  stripping everything out bringing things back to basics; using some clothes from  previous shoots I dipped everything in white paint giving each garment this  restriction when worn in some ways a life of its own. The next step was showing what  I was trying to say; I wanted to do it in a very tactile, interactive way. I  thought about the essence of what it is all about. This idea of looking the same  in fact allows this negative mass production of conforming. From this I  started to look into repetition and applying that to the garments, playing around  with a very simple everyday garment such as a white shirt laying up a cuff or  collar.

Aimi Gibbons, Fashion Stylist

I started this project by taking over indulgent, excess qualities leading to a sense of entrapment within the obsession. As I got further into the project this changed, I began stripping things down looking at trends on the catwalk such as Vandevorst, Margiela, Celine and studying the simplicity in fabrics and textures appear to be moving forward into s/s 10 and a/w 10. This sense of honesty that these collections show I wanted to bring into my own work and started to reference the clinical side of surgery, the medical aspect, hospital gowns, these unflattering shapes, the unsexyness of it all. After developing this further through various shoots and research I began to think about my market and being Margiela, I applied his “white” aesthetic, stripping everything out bringing things back to basics; using some clothes from previous shoots I dipped everything in white paint giving each garment this restriction when worn in some ways a life of its own. The next step was showing what I was trying to say; I wanted to do it in a very tactile, interactive way. I thought about the essence of what it is all about. This idea of looking the same in fact allows this negative mass production of conforming. From this I started to look into repetition and applying that to the garments, playing around with a very simple everyday garment such as a white shirt laying up a cuff or collar.

Jasmine Howard-Evans, Fashion Textiles
“Tonight we fly”
 This collection began with the idea of  escapism. The starting point was aviation, both feathered and  mechanical. Birds and planes. I explored this through sweeping brush  strokes and blobs of acrylic paint, contrasted with fine pencil lines  and geometric shapes. 
 I have formed clean, uncomplicated shapes  through examining the garments of 1940’s pilots and land workers. Using  durable fabrics in the same context as fine silks continues the theme of  contrast found in my collection.
 The idea of organic and spontaneous has  meant that each print has been created using pages directly from my  sketchbook, whilst each garment has come from literal interpretations of  details within my preliminary illustrations. 

Jasmine Howard-Evans, Fashion Textiles

“Tonight we fly”

This collection began with the idea of escapism. The starting point was aviation, both feathered and mechanical. Birds and planes. I explored this through sweeping brush strokes and blobs of acrylic paint, contrasted with fine pencil lines and geometric shapes.

I have formed clean, uncomplicated shapes through examining the garments of 1940’s pilots and land workers. Using durable fabrics in the same context as fine silks continues the theme of contrast found in my collection.

The idea of organic and spontaneous has meant that each print has been created using pages directly from my sketchbook, whilst each garment has come from literal interpretations of details within my preliminary illustrations. 

Luke Allen, Fashion Textiles

My final collection is based around the idea of redesigning the British brand Barbour to appeal to a new and younger market. I wanted to design a collection that was sharp, and contemporary, but still keeping elements of the brand’s heritage. I have kept the spirit of Barbour in my collection with the use of their signature fastenings, corduroy backed collars and top stitching.

 I started researching into contemporary architecture such as the Swiss Re tower in London, and really enjoy translating the shapes and structured lines found in modern architecture into interesting garment designs. From this research I went on to discover and to be inspired by process called Triangulation.

 “Triangulation is the process of determining the location of a point by measuring angles to it from known points at either end of a fixed baseline.”

 This is a traditional way of measuring distance and volume of objects and vessels. I have taken this method and applied it to my pattern cutting process with the idea of creating 3D forms that cover the body to make up new and innovative garments. The idea of contrast is also heavily used in my collection, teaming the structured pieces made from the infamous Barbour waxed cotton with delicate draped jersey and chiffon pieces that are hand dyed to create an ombré effect. The balance of these contrasts creates a clean and contemporary collection.

Sabrina Miller, Fashion Textiles

The concept behind my collection is a combination of medieval body armour and underwear as outerwear. I chose these two ideas as my inspiration as they have similarities in the way they both protect the body. However they differentiate as medieval armour is a visible outer layer worn to defend the body from any harm, where as underwear is a hidden secret layer, but it still provides a layer of protection to our body underneath our garments.

I have always had a fascination in body armour, the garments have such an interesting structure, silhouette and construction to them.

I also want an element of seductiveness to my designs as the armour influence can be conceived as harsh and masculine, whereas underwear is the complete opposite being seen as very feminine and sexy, along with it’s structured, panels and light fabrics. Combining these two contrasting ideas together still gives me a strong masculine look but with a sexy womanly edge.

My collection is all about experimentation with structure, silhouette, texture, knit and seam lines to creative a new and fresh twist on armour and underwear in clothing. It’s a sophisticated, cohesive collection with a few extravagant pieces to tantalize the audience. My styling and accessories are also a major part to my collection, these are the key pieces that will link my collection together.

Lauren Macaulay, Fashion Design 
Menswear
The Outlaws of Hangtown.
An outlaw.  An  outcast of society.  A man on the run.  For as long as he can remember he has been running from the Sheriff of Hangtown. It seems to him that everything is  high round his neck, closing round his throat - he wears an imagined noose.  With a revolver firmly in his grasp, he fights against man and nature. Drifting through the Wild West there is nothing  to great him but endless blue sky and scorched red earth.  Sun  bleached and weary, his clothes snagged by clawing hands as he tries to twist free.  Will the  lynch mob finally catch up with this desperate soul?
Drawing  has played an integral part in the process of design evolving into a narrative that accompanies the collection.  Taking a fresh  approach to menswear I have formed new and exciting silhouettes taken  from this story, which has in turn been inspired by Hangtown in California, the  myth of American Outlaws and surviving the Gold Rush.
www.laurenmacaulay.co.uk

Lauren Macaulay, Fashion Design 

Menswear

The Outlaws of Hangtown.

An outlaw.  An outcast of society.  A man on the run.  For as long as he can remember he has been running from the Sheriff of Hangtown. It seems to him that everything is high round his neck, closing round his throat - he wears an imagined noose.  With a revolver firmly in his grasp, he fights against man and nature. Drifting through the Wild West there is nothing to great him but endless blue sky and scorched red earth.  Sun bleached and weary, his clothes snagged by clawing hands as he tries to twist free.  Will the lynch mob finally catch up with this desperate soul?

Drawing has played an integral part in the process of design evolving into a narrative that accompanies the collection.  Taking a fresh approach to menswear I have formed new and exciting silhouettes taken from this story, which has in turn been inspired by Hangtown in California, the myth of American Outlaws and surviving the Gold Rush.

www.laurenmacaulay.co.uk

Model Casting for the Show

Model Casting for the Show

Lucia Jaconelli, Fashion Textiles
‘Broken  Beads’ showcases a vibrant, boxy, textile collection with a fresh  contemporary twist.
The  vast continent of Africa exudes diversity, from it’s rich  tribal ancestry to the modern dusty shanty towns, has inspired a  creation of contemporary African dress code: from full length skirts to  casual shirts and crop tops.
The  rich tribal adornment of body art and beads has been transferred onto  textiles in the form of broken embroidery, graduated prints and  disintegrated embellishment.
Intense  African tones derived from the natural landscape, contrast strikingly  with black and white monotone, reflect an urban mix enhanced by bold  graphic prints. Lightweight wool crepes, soft cottons and sand silk  provide a platform for print placements inspired by tribal scars.
 A  wearable collection reflecting the designer’s interpretation of the  diverse cultures of East London.

Lucia Jaconelli, Fashion Textiles

‘Broken Beads’ showcases a vibrant, boxy, textile collection with a fresh contemporary twist.

The vast continent of Africa exudes diversity, from it’s rich tribal ancestry to the modern dusty shanty towns, has inspired a creation of contemporary African dress code: from full length skirts to casual shirts and crop tops.

The rich tribal adornment of body art and beads has been transferred onto textiles in the form of broken embroidery, graduated prints and disintegrated embellishment.

Intense African tones derived from the natural landscape, contrast strikingly with black and white monotone, reflect an urban mix enhanced by bold graphic prints. Lightweight wool crepes, soft cottons and sand silk provide a platform for print placements inspired by tribal scars.

 A wearable collection reflecting the designer’s interpretation of the diverse cultures of East London.

Emma Bergamin Davys, Fashion Design

My collection focuses around the idea of changing oneself, dressing up and becoming something else. This lead me to become interested in transvestites particularly looking at vintage images of men dressed as woman. Another source of inspiration were the bright young things of the 1920’s, a group of young wealthy men and women who spent much of their time dressing up for infamous fancy dress parties. Women often dressed as men and men as woman strengthening this already formed element of my collection. Using materials such as fibre-glass and lenticular plastic, as well as more traditional softer fabrics, I have brought together ideas from these two groups of people, along with other research, to create my own idea of dress. 

Lara Angol, Fashion Stylist

Objects and ideas that are profoundly unrelated to Fashion often prove to be the greatest source of visual information.
In this case, a fascination with the obscure and secretive, namely Freemasony and Fundamentalist latter day saints (a polygamous religious sect) provided the starting point to this 2D outcome. Using the visuals and concepts found in amongst the unexpected, new forms and looks are created and explored through editorial styling. The challenge: creating something new and innovative from pre-existing information.

Techniques in the way a garment is represented both of and on the body are explored and new shapes are formed, for example, by buttoning silk shirts into the button holes of cotton shirts. The term ‘styling’ becomes all about reinterpreting the function of  sleeves, collars, hemlines, cuffs or simply a white cotton t-shirt with an underlying sense of alchemy.

The photographic outcomes of this body of work will be presented in an editorial context. TIGHTS magazine (an off shoot of the stylists blog iweartights.tumblr.com) will provide a platform for each of these photo shoots or ‘compositions’ as they will find themselves arranged in the wider composition of the magazine itself.